CBD News Headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • First evidence that seals can consume microplastics via their prey
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Microplastics can transfer up the food chain from fish to top predators, such as seals, reveals new research by Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML), University of Exeter and the Cornish Seal Sanctuary.
  • U.S. cities are the vanguard for a sustainable future
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    In the absence of federal leadership on climate change, America's cities have become the vanguard of the country's efforts to create a sustainable future. Recently, 233 mayors from 46 states and territories, representing 51 million residents across the country, have signed an open letter opposing the repeal of the Clean Power Plan (CPP), the nation's most comprehensive strategy to combat climate change.
  • Climate Change Checkup, February 2018
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    As La Niña runs its course and continues to prevent global temperatures from reaching new record highs, there is still much to report about global warming and its effects on the atmosphere and ocean - some good, but mostly bad.
  • Bolivia's indigenous women cope with climate change
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Bolivia is among the many countries around the world now dealing with the consequences of global warming, including extreme weather patterns.
  • Involve indigenous people in climate change fight
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    In October 2015, Uganda submitted her Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) way ahead of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that took place in Paris, December 2015.
  • Climate change will force mammals to get picky about mating
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    For obvious reasons, it pays for prey to blend in with the environment around them. For individual animals, it means hunters won't spot them as easily. Entire species benefit, though, when the survivors make it to mating season to pass on their successful genes.
  • 'Photo Ark' a quest to document global biodiversity: Q&A with photographer Joel Sartore and director Chun-Wei Yi
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    At turns haunting, humorous or just downright bizarre, the studio portraits of the thousands of animal species that photographer Joel Sartore has collected are more than just a catalog of life on Earth. When someone sees one of his photographs for the National Geographic Photo Ark, Sartore wants the encounter, often with an animal looking directly into the camera's lens, to be inspiring.
  • How Scotland's beavers came back, and how you can help
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Beavers were extirpated from Scotland by about the 16th century. Our ancestors hunted them for their pelts and for castoreum, a secretion that contains natural aspirin.
  • Seasonal patterns in the Amazon explained
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Environmental scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have led an international collaboration to improve satellite observations of tropical forests.
  • We should protect our forests
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Forests are the lungs of the earth. The air we breath, the stability of our climate and the rich variety of life all depend on forests. Forests are home to nearly two-thirds of all plant and animal species found on land and millions of people depend on them for survival.
  • Circular Economy 101: Waste Not, Get More
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Across the globe, about 50 percent of CO2 emissions are tied to materials - goods that often produce a significant amount of physical and financial waste. The United Nations estimates that the 41.8 million tonnes (Mt) of electronic waste generated in 2014, for example, included 16 Mt of copper and 300 tonnes of gold, plus other precious metals such as palladium. This material had a combined value of $52 billion.
  • Cryptic New Species of Shark Identified: Atlantic Sixgill Shark
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    The sixgill sharks of the genus Hexanchus are large, rarely encountered deep-sea sharks. With ancestors dating back over 250 million years, well before dinosaurs, they are among the oldest creatures on Earth.
  • The Seychelles has struck a 'debt-for-nature swap' with Leonardo DiCaprio
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    The Seychelles has floated a plan to deepen its marine conservation efforts in return for a groundbreaking sovereign debt deal backed by funds including the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.
  • Bleached coral reefs to heal by 2022 Coral reef monitoring takes to the skies
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Why are scientists turning to aerial images to monitor the health of ecosystems found beneath the ocean's surface? Coral reefs support millions of species ranging from single-celled algae to sharks and sea turtles. However, this diversity, coupled with the scattered and often remote (underwater) locations of reefs, makes it challenging to monitor these ecosystems effectively.
  • A global view of species diversity in high elevations, via mountain birds
    [released on: 21/02/2018]
    A new look at mountain birds is helping Yale University researchers test long-held assumptions about species richness in high elevations.
  • Researchers optimise broad beans for bees
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Scientists from Royal Holloway, University of London and the University of Cambridge have been taking part in an experiment to optimise broad beans to increase bee visitation rates; and their findings could benefit both the beans and the bees.
  • Asian elephants have different personality traits just like humans
    [released on: 22/02/2018]
    Researchers of the University of Turku, Finland, have studied a timber elephant population in Myanmar and discovered that Asian elephant personality manifests through three factors. The personality factors identified by the researchers are attentiveness, sociability and aggressiveness.