CBD News Headlines

RDF feed: https://www.cbd.int/rss/headlines.aspx
  • How to set ambitious goals for sustainable agriculture
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Food production in the Netherlands is an economic success but has led to many environmental issues, including nitrogen pollution. Recently, the policy to allow economic growth while reducing nitrogen losses was disapproved by the highest court in the Netherlands, casting the country into a nitrogen crisis.
  • Air pollution linked to higher risk of irreversible sight loss
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Small increases in air pollution are linked to an increased risk of irreversible sight loss from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a large UK study has found.
  • New Zealand school climate strikers call for 'can-do Kiwi attitude' to combat crisis
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    School climate strikes have resumed in New Zealand, with young people calling on the government to turn the "can-do Kiwi attitude" that beat Covid-19 towards tackling the climate emergency.
  • An unexpected consequence of climate change: Heatwaves kill plant pests and save our favorite giant trees
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Australia is sweltering through another heatwave, and there will be more in the near future as climate change brings hotter, drier weather. In some parts of Australia, the number of days above 40? will double by 2090, and with it the tragedy of more heat-related deaths.
  • 3,000 scientists call for governments and businesses to 'step up' adaptation to climate change
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    More than 3,000 scientists have called for a far bigger global push to protect people and nature from the effects of a heating planet, even as researchers estimated funding to adapt to climate change has dropped because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Pakistan improves on global climate change vulnerability rankings
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    A recent study has found that Pakistan was able to reduce its vulnerability to climate change by three points. Titled "Global Climate Risk Index 2021", the report by Germanwatch was released on Monday and showed Pakistan drop from 5th most vulnerable country to climate change, to the 8th position.
  • Climate change will destroy communities. Let's help them move now.
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Last week, the U.S. rejoined the Paris Climate Agreement. But even if its targets are met - and most countries are far from hitting them - the world will still likely be headed for a 3°C global temperature rise.
  • Kenya vows to fully implement global climate change adaptation agenda
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta has expressed his government's commitment to implementing global climate change adaptation initiatives.
  • Climate change puts pressure on failing Caribbean water supplies
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Noreen Nunez lives in a middle-class neighborhood that rises up a hillside in Trinidad's Tunapuna-Piarco region. Accessed by a long, winding road bordered by trees, the houses, built in the 1970s and 1980s, are mainly painted in pastel shades. Dotted among fruit trees in their sizeable backyards are huge water tanks, mounted on concrete slabs.
  • Global Climate Litigation Report: 2020 Status Review
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Climate litigation cases have spiked in recent years, making the courtroom increasingly relevant to efforts to address climate change around the world. A UN Environment Programme (UNEP) report released today finds that climate cases have nearly doubled over the last three years and are increasingly compelling governments and corporate actors to implement their climate commitments, as well as pursue more ambitious climate change mitigation and adaptation goals.
  • Global agricultural research network CGIAR joins forces with World Food Programme to tackle post-pandemic hunger
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    The world's largest publicly-funded agricultural research network, CGIAR, has united effort with the UN World Food Programme (WFP) to help tackle hunger and malnutrition in the pandemic recovery.
  • Blackbuck population increasing in Nepal
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    The total population of blackbucks stands somewhere near 50,000 in the world now. At present, Nepal and Pakistan are the only countries that have natural habitats for the endangered species. There are two sub-species of blackbucks in the world. The sub-species found in Nepal is called antelope cervicapra.
  • Oxford 'tiny forests' planted to promote biodiversity
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Two "tiny forests" are being planted in Oxford to create wildlife havens and help city-goers connect with nature. About 600 densely planted trees will fill each tennis court-sized plot at Meadow Lane Nature Reserve and Foxwell Drive.
  • Why forest-based carbon trading is poised to go mainstream
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Ten years after it dropped off the sustainability radar, forest-based carbon trading is finally poised to get off the ground for real.
  • Ten "golden rules" for reforestation have been set out by scientists as they warned poorly executed tree planting schemes can harm the environment.
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Planting trees to reduce carbon emissions can be presented as an "easy answer" to tackling the climate crisis, but it can cause more problems than benefits, experts have said.
  • 'A remarkable phenomenon': billions of cicadas set to emerge across eastern US
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Billions of cicadas that have spent 17 years underground are set to emerge across large areas of the eastern US, bringing swarming numbers and loud mating calls to major towns and cities.
  • EU chief calls for Paris-style biodiversity pact
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen called on Tuesday for a global agreement on protecting biodiversity with the same scale and ambition as the Paris climate pact.
  • Environmental legislation delay 'deeply troubling'
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Campaigners have criticised new delays to flagship environmental legislation on pollution, wildlife protection and cutting waste. The Environment Bill seeks to write environmental principles in UK law for the first time, following Brexit, but the UK Government has delayed the passage of the Bill, so it is not expected to become law until the autumn.
  • China's new animal health rules alone won't stop zoonotic outbreaks, experts warn
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    China's attempts to prevent another zoonotic disease outbreak will fail without deep changes in enforcement, oversight, and extensive investment to ramp up veterinary capacity, say experts.
  • Invasive Alien Birds May Threaten Himalayan Biodiversity in Coming Decades: Study
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Alien birds are spreading across southeast Asia and could reach India-either due to escaping captivity or after being intentionally released, report researchers from the University College London (UCL).
  • Protected areas expand by 635,000 ha
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Some 635,000 hectares of natural lands added to the country's protected areas due to the biological values, Mehr news agency reported on Monday.
  • Biodiversity: Why foods grown in warm climates could be doing the most damage to wildlife
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Nearly half of the food eaten in the UK is grown abroad. Take your morning tea or coffee. These are just two of the many crops grown in tropical and sub-tropical climates that depend on animal pollination and countless other services provided by wildlife before they can reach our kitchen tables. But how often do we consider biodiversity when enjoying them?
  • When push comes to shove, what is a fight?
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Biologists often study animal sociality by collecting observations about several types of behavioral interactions. These interactions can be things like severe fights, minor fights, cooperative food sharing, or grooming each other.
  • Kakadu food scraps provide ancient rainfall clues
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Archaeologists are generating a 65,000-year-old rainfall record from ancient food scraps found at Australia's earliest-known site of human occupation. University of Queensland researcher Dr. Anna Florin said the research was giving a glimpse into the Kakadu region's environment from the time when people first entered the continent from the north.
  • Hygienic honey bees are more resistant to destructive parasite
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite that affects honeybees. It originated in Asia, but has spread to almost every region of the world. Domestic honey bees, Apis mellifera, are particularly vulnerable to this parasite, which can cause the loss of a colony in just a few months, as well as significant economic losses for beekeepers.
  • Seabird guano fertilizer drove robust agriculture in Atacama Desert from AD 1000
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Seabird guano fertilizer-also known as 'white gold'-could have been responsible for the highly productive agricultural systems of pre-Incan civilization in the otherwise arid climate of the Atacama Desert. These findings, reported in a paper published in Nature Plants, shed light on the development of the large population centers and society between AD 1000 and AD 1450 in what is now northern Chile.
  • Climbing the koala's family tree
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    Koalas are one of Australia's most beloved marsupials. How can DNA help bring them back from the brink of extinction? The koala is the latest species to have its DNA digitized and uploaded to the cloud. Its genome joins the quokka as the newest member of the open source online DNA Zoo database.
  • Survey shows more wildflowers in bloom during January than ever before
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    The tenth New Year Plant Hunt saw more than 1,800 plant-lovers across the UK visit local countryside to record all manner of flora, including more new species than in previous years.
  • The inner ear hides clues on human evolution
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    A PNAS study led by the Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP) analyzed the kinship between two Miocene great apes (Hispanopithecus and Rudapithecus) based on the morphology of their inner ear semicircular canals.
  • Energy spent avoiding humans linked to smaller home ranges for male pumas
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    In the Santa Cruz mountains, pumas are top predators, patrolling a diverse landscape of forests, meadows, peaks, and valleys. But "mountain lion country" is also bordered by coastal cities to the west and Silicon Valley to the east, with major roadways and fringes of development reaching into wildlands.
  • New species of custard apple family found in Myanmar
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    With over 100 species, Artabotrys is a large palaeotropical genus that belongs to the custard apple family (Annonacea), one of the most diverse and primitive families of the angiosperms. In Myanmar, the genus is represented by seven species.
  • When the world of dinosaurs was rocked, so was the climate
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    As tropical forests are cleared for agriculture and coral reefs overheat from rising temperatures, thousands of species vanish into oblivion, unable to survive the rapid climatic and environmental changes of the Anthropocene-the age of the sixth mass extinction.
  • About 25% of All Bee Species 'Unseen' Since 1990
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    For the last three decades, up to 25 percent of all bee species are said to have fallen off international global data, despite a major rise in the number of such records that exist.
  • Salt making revives Fijian traditional knowledge
    [released on: 26/01/2021]
    In December 2019, UNDP Fiji through the Accelerator Lab Pacific embarked on an experiment to understand the interplay between traditional knowledge, cultural identity and climate resilience. Our research indicated that resilient communities used traditional indigenous knowledge as a foundation for decision making and in some communities the lack of codification and diffusion of this knowledge was hampering their resilience. The Accelerator Lab Pacific hypothesized that if communities revived their traditional practices, it would