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  • Climate Change Would be an Olympics Issue, New Study Finds
    [released on: 16/06/2021]
    Heat and humidity could pose an additional risk to athletes at this summer's planned Tokyo Olympics, a new report published by the British Association for Sustainable Sport found. The impacts from the rapidly rising temperatures could cause health problems.
  • The search for the Dr. Fauci of climate change
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    It's easy to think about the global climate crisis in the abstract. Ella Adoo-Kissi-Debrah's death gave it a face. The 9-year-old girl's fatal asthma attack might have passed without public notice except for the fact that, after a long legal fight, it became the first British death officially attributed to fossil fuel-caused air pollution.
  • How poorly timed traffic lights can make climate change worse
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    All drivers know the feeling: You're cruising down the road, making good time, but a traffic light ahead turns red. You have to stop and wait, even if there are no other cars at the intersection.
  • UN blasts world leaders for failing to seal £72bn-a-year deal on climate
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    The head of climate change at the UN has warned that world leaders are still "far away" from securing a deal to limit the disastrous effects of global heating, with less than five months to go before a key summit in Glasgow.
  • Show your Stripes Day meaning: Why are people sharing climate crisis graphic today
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Climate scientists, broadcast meteorologists, and citizens are uniting on 21 June - the summer solstice or Show Your Stripes Day - to raise awareness around the climate crisis.
  • Climate change decimating Yemen's bee farms
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    After driving for days on the rough roads of southern Yemen, Radwan Hizam finally reached the idyllic spot where he hoped his bees could feed from flowering Sidr trees to produce their world-renowned honey. But he was too late.
  • Smaller bodies, longer wings, earlier migrations: Untangling the multiple impacts of climate warming
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    When a University of Michigan-led research team reported last year that North American migratory birds have been getting smaller over the past four decades and that their wings have gotten a bit longer, the scientists wondered if they were seeing the fingerprint of earlier spring migrations.
  • Help set our Climate Change priorities
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    The forum is the next step in Strathbogie Shire's Council's work to address the impacts of Climate Change. Council recently became the 100th Council in Australia to declare a Climate Emergency and just the third to pass this Notice of Motion unanimously.
  • Don't feel hungry when it's hot? Some animals in Australia are starving as climate change drives up temperatures
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Animals are suffering and starving despite having ample amounts of food as climate change drives up temperatures and exacerbates heatwave events, according to new research.
  • Five Million Years of Climate Change Found Preserved in One Location
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    An international team of researchers, led by the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Germany, has now succeeded in reconstructing changes in rainfall and its effects by studying Charyn Canyon in southeast Kazakhstan in Central Asia.
  • Investing $8.1 Trillion In Nature By 2050 Will Slow the Impact of Climate Change
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    A new report has found that investing less than 1% of global GDP in nature-based solutions can help tackle climate change and halt biodiversity loss. At the moment, investments in these solutions total to US$133 billion, which is 0.10% of global GDP. And if governments and people want to meet their climate change targets, a total of US$4.1 trillion is needed to close the financing gap in nature by 2050.
  • Climate change may lead to more landfalling tropical cyclones in China
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Tropical cyclones (TCs) can bring strong wind, heavy rain and storm surge. Meteorologists are concerned that the effects of global warming may change how these storms impact humans.
  • For the Butterflies - and the Rest of Us
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    For Christmas last year, my husband ordered a sign for my butterfly garden from the Xerxes Society for Invertebrate Conservation, a nonprofit that works to protect insects and other invertebrates around the world.
  • Drought threatens to become the next pandemic
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    "Drought is on the verge of becoming the next pandemic, and there is no vaccine to cure it." "Drought has directly affected 1.5 billion people so far this century, and this number will grow dramatically unless the world gets better at managing this risk," said Mami Mizutori, the United Nations Secretary-General's special representative for disaster risk reduction (UNDRR). Mizutori was speaking before the launch of the Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction's (GAR) Special Report on Drought 2021, released on June 17.
  • Don't Forget the People
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    With the start of the United Nations' Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, which runs through 2030, a tremendous amount of money and effort will be put into re-growing forests, making over-exploited farmland productive, and reviving damaged marine environments.
  • Mexico's bee guardians on mission to save species
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Adriana Veliz whispered affectionately as she removed a colony of bees from inside a statue in a Mexican backyard - part of her mission to help save them from extinction. "Relax babies, relax. You'll be fine," the 32-year-old veterinarian said as the bees swarmed around her and clung to the white suit she wore to protect against their stings.
  • Tasmanian devils wipe out thousands of penguins on tiny Australian island
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    An attempt to save the Tasmanian devil by shipping an "insurance population" to a tiny Australian island has come at a "catastrophic" cost to the birdlife there, including the complete elimination of little penguins, according to BirdLife Tasmania.
  • Elephant in the room: visitor crashes through kitchen wall in Thailand
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Ratchadawan Puengprasoppon was awoken in the early hours of Saturday morning by crashing and banging. When she went to find out what had happened, she discovered an elephant's head poking through her kitchen wall beside the drying rack.
  • Natural Infrastructure Can Boost the Post-Pandemic Recovery
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Mitigating flooding and erosion, sequestering carbon, purifying water and providing a habitat for aquatic species - natural infrastructure projects can add resilience to an economic recovery from COVID-19. They can also create needed jobs.
  • California's Opportunity to Shape Worldwide Biodiversity Policy
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    California, like the rest of the world, must wrestle with a hard truth: Our climate has changed. As we face another water-shortage crisis, we must acknowledge a sobering reality: We're not in a drought. This is our new normal. And we need to adapt.
  • How oysters and seagrass could help the California coast adapt to rising seas
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    On a sunny afternoon in April, Katie Nichols crouched over the edges of a small oyster reef in Newport Bay, California, peering into the mud that had been exposed by the receding tide. Where all I saw was a jumble of interchangeable shell fragments, Nichols quickly spotted what she was looking for.
  • Ocean Microbes Act As 'Methane Sinks,' Can Help Tackle Climate Change: Study
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Microorganisms found in the ocean may play an important role in the process of mitigating climate change by acting as "methane sinks" on ocean floors, a new study has found.
  • How many oceans are there?
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    A NEW OCEAN has appeared on the maps of the National Geographic Society, an American research and conservation organisation. The Southern Ocean, which encircles Antarctica, will henceforth be given the same status, and typeface, as the Arctic, Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • One of the largest ever land mammals evolved into extinct dwarf elephant
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    An extinct species of dwarf elephant experienced a weight and height reduction of 8,000kg and almost two meters after evolving from one of the largest land mammals that ever lived, a new study has confirmed.
  • Ancient bones provide clues about Kangaroo Island's past and future
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    A Curtin University-led study of ancient bones on South Australia's Kangaroo Island has provided new information about the Island's past fauna and an insight into how species may live there in the future.
  • Pathogenic bacteria rendered almost harmless
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium present in many ecological niches, such as plant roots, stagnant water or even the pipes of our homes. Naturally very versatile, it can cause acute and chronic infections that are potentially fatal for people with weakened immune systems.
  • An at-risk species of fish has established itself in lochs across Scotland
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    An at-risk species of fish has established itself in lochs across Scotland with the help of conservation managers and by rapidly adapting to its new environment, resulting in changes to their DNA, their ecology, and body shape, according to a new study.
  • The end of Darwin's nightmare at Lake Victoria?
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Lake Victoria, which came under the spotlight in 2004 by the documentary "Darwin's Nightmare," is not only suffering from the introduction and commercialisation of the Nile perch. A study lead researchers from the University of Liège (Belgium) has highlighted other worrying phenomena, particularly climatic ones, which have an equally important impact on the quality of the lake's waters.
  • Blackologists and the promise of inclusive sustainability
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Historically, shared resources such as forests, fishery stocks and pasture lands have often been managed with an aim toward averting "tragedies of the commons," which are thought to result from selfish overuse.
  • Small genetic clues to track the ocean's elusive gentle giants
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    A new research tool involving the simple task of filling a bottle with seawater could revolutionize how scientists track individual whale sharks and monitor their populations.
  • Researchers develop new software for designing sustainable cities
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    New technology could help cities around the world improve people's lives while saving billions of dollars. The free, open-source software developed by the Stanford Natural Capital Project creates maps to visualize the links between nature and human wellbeing.
  • Researchers look to locals to fill knowledge gap on Philippine tarsier
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Filip Wojciechowski moved to the island of Bohol in the Philippines in 2014 to study one of the country's most elusive nocturnal primates, the Philippine tarsier. But he hadn't reckoned on getting so close to one quite as soon as he did. Shortly after arriving, he was approached by a villager who offered to sell him one of the small brown mammals as a pet.
  • New report shows why fighting climate change and nature loss must be interlinked
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    The twin crises of nature loss and climate change are inextricably linked. For too long, however, biodiversity loss and climate change have been discussed and dealt with in siloes, even by independent international frameworks of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. We may, however, be at an important turning point.
  • The pandemic has revived hope that a more sustainable world is possible
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Some of the most striking images from the early days of the pandemic, when public health orders and lockdowns ground economies to a halt, were the arresting photos of the Himalayas, suddenly visible from across northern India, as decades of unrelenting smog finally abated.
  • Nepali conservationist among Rolex awardees
    [released on: 21/06/2021]
    Anew generation of Nepali environmental activists is filling the void left by the tragic 2006 Ghunsa crash that saw the loss of many pioneering conservationists including Harka Gurung and Chandra Gurung.