CBD News Headlines

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  • Gardening Communities: Agroecology and Gardening within the Slow Food Global Network
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Gardening and small-scale agriculture has been our basic activity to produce food for thousands of years. In our current food systems, we are far from this reality and far from the understanding of what it takes to grow food while respecting nature, the environment, and communities.
  • Odisha Adopts Champion's Vision to Safeguard its Biodiversity
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Organic farming and environment conservation through protection of forest resources in Odisha has made Professor Radhamohan, a Padma Shri award winner this year, an icon beyond the boundaries of his state. Many come to his not-for-profit organisation, Sambhav, based in Nayagarh district to learn from his varied experiences on conservation of soil, water and forest resources.
  • Locust invasion hits crops as Pakistan suffers worst infestation in 20 years
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    A swarm of desert locusts is destroying crops and threatening the livelihoods of farmers in Pakistan's Punjab province. The country, which is facing its worst locust infestation in two decades, declared a national emergency earlier this month.
  • More plastic is on the way: What it means for climate change
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    With the recent fracking boom causing low gas prices, fossil fuel companies are seeking other ways to bolster their profits-by making more plastic. Just as the world is starting to address its enormous plastic pollution problem, these companies are doubling down on plastic, with huge potential consequences for climate and the environment.
  • Canary island airports reopen as haze clears
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    All eight airports on Spain's Canary Islands reopened on Monday a day after a sandstorm shrouded the archipelago, forcing their closure, the transport ministry said.
  • Scientists gather to study risk from microplastic pollution
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Tiny bits of broken-down plastic smaller than a fraction of a grain of riceare turning up everywhere in oceans, from the water tothe guts of fish and the poop of sea otters and giant killer whales.
  • Africa at risk - Climate Weekly
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    African nations are among the most vulnerable to climate change, with ever more heatwaves, droughts and floods disrupting water and food supplies on the world's poorest continent.
  • In Mexico's cradle of corn, climate change leaves its mark
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    At least 9,000 years ago, humans began domesticating corn for the first time near Tehuacan, in the central Mexican state of Puebla, laying the foundation for permanent settlements in the Americas.
  • New studies explore how knowledge drives action in climate change decision-making
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    In several new studies, University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher Katharine Mach and colleagues explore the importance of learning and knowledge in environmental decision-making and the different ways in which scientific knowledge can become more relevant and useful for societies
  • 'It is a little puzzling': readers on early signs of spring
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    In February last year our gardening team were out clearing snow' There are beautiful signs of spring popping up in the grounds of the hospice where I work. It's hard not to have mixed emotions: it is beautiful, especially bathed in bright winter sunshine, but knowing it's only early February means we could just as quickly have deep snow next week
  • Colorado River flow shrinks from climate crisis, risking 'severe water shortages'
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    The flow of the Colorado River is dwindling due to the impacts of global heating, risking "severe water shortages" for the millions of people who rely upon one of America's most storied waterways, researchers have found.
  • Backing the trillion tree campaign to combat climate crisi
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    The recent explosion of interest in tree restoration has transformed the climate change conversation. Although the trillion tree campaign - 1T.org - is now in the realm of politicians and influencers (Greta Thunberg: Davos leaders ignored climate activists' demands, 24 January), it emerged from scientific literature. But what exactly did the science show?
  • 52nd session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    I am honoured to address you today at the 52nd session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) because the IPCC has been, without a doubt, an incredible, positive scientific force in laying out the scale and consequences of climate change and what we must to do lessen the threat it poses to humanity and the planet.
  • Consumption-driven climate change leaves the poor worse off
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Climate change is disproportionately impacting the poor, elderly and people with a disability , according to an expert from The Australian National University (ANU).
  • Report warns climate change could become 'catastrophic' global, national security threat
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    National security and intelligence experts warn that climate change could become a "catastrophic" threat to security and recommended quick action to be taken to mitigate risks, according to a new report released Monday.
  • What Machiavelli would make of climate change
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Major climatic shifts have long been a feature of human society. But the scientific evidence overwhelmingly points to man-made rather than cyclical causes of contemporary climate change. And with those changes, we have seen nearly annual rises in global temperature averages. Today's climate change has also caused general climate instability resulting in water-supply shortages and devastating droughts; tropical systems dumping feet of water on cities such as Houston; and people freezing to death during cold snaps linked to the polar vortex.
  • Finalists Announced for World Wildlife Day Film Showcase
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Judges and organizers of the World Wildlife Day 2020 Film Showcase have unveiled the finalists of this year's contest, highlighting 57 outstanding films, picked from a total of 345 entries. The seven final laureates will be announced on 3 March, during the World Wildlife Day celebrations at a high-level event at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.
  • 150K Nature Illustrations Spanning Hundreds of Years Are Now Free Online
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Thanks to the Biodiversity Heritage Library, you can easily peruse nature drawings, Charles Darwin's personal library and many other works in the public domain.
  • Amazing photos show gorillas deep in jungle home - for first time in over decade
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    These photos show wild gorillas spotted deep in their natural jungle habitat within a national park - for the first time in more than a DECADE. The hidden camera traps show the curious young apes exploring their wooded home, and warily approaching the cameras to investigate.
  • Extinction: Meet the new poster animals of conservation
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    They could be the future icons of conservation, according to a study. Scientists say these little-known animals are key to raising money for protecting vulnerable ecosystems. The likes of tigers and elephants, which appeal to the masses, are often selected for fundraising campaigns.
  • Explainer: COP15, the biggest biodiversity conference in a decade
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Biodiversity encompasses the full variety of life - all genes, species and ecosystems - and it is in danger, which means we are too. As this article explains, a major conference in China this year could have a big impact on our collective fate by helping to end biodiversity loss.
  • We have a chance to halt biodiversity loss. The stakes have never been higher
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    The year 2020 has been designated a "super year for nature", when the global community will rededicate itself to halting biodiversity loss with a 10-year action agenda, scheduled for agreement at the conference of the parties to the UN Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) in Kunming in China in October.
  • World's food systems rely on biodiversity
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Rome - Everything we eat is produced in ways that imply some transformation of the environment, which means we must have careful discussions of the type and scale of transformations we are prepared to accept, FAO Director-General QU Dongyu said today in opening remarks to negotiators at a high-level meeting on biodiversity.
  • Nations seek biodiversity accord to stave off mass extinction
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Nature experts and government delegates gather this week in Rome to thrash out an international deal for endangered species, trying to avoid a mass extinction event caused by human activity. Having been hastily relocated from Kunming in China following the coronavirus outbreak, negotiators from more than 140 countries have until February 29 to study a draft text.
  • UN biodiversity meeting needs to deliver transformative change, not just targets
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    There are just eight months left to make progress on a framework to protect biodiversity for the next ten years. It is of global importance that the October meeting of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in the Chinese city of Kunming helps the world to stop biodiversity loss.
  • We need system change'
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    A draft global plan to halt the collapse of nature will not protect vulnerable communities or stop the Earth's sixth mass extinction, claims Friends of the Earth International. The call comes as governments meet in Rome for the first time today to work on a "Paris-style" United Nations agreement that will eventually be agreed in October.
  • Negotiations start on global 'Paris-style' deal to avert Earth's sixth mass extinction
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Government ministers from across the globe will this week discuss a draft plan aimed at halting the collapse of nature by 2030, a deal likened as the Paris Agreement for biodiversity.
  • How Do We Protect Our Unique Biodiversity From Megafires?
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Australia's season of bushfires shows us just how easily our unique biodiversity and ecosystems could be wiped out. Now is the time for long-term planning for climate change to protect them
  • This is not a forest
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Have we forgotten the inherently tangled, interdependent nature of ecosystems, the ecological value of old-growth, the microcosm of habitats provided by diversity?
  • Fossilized wing gives clues about Labrador's biodiversity during Cretaceous
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    A fossilised insect wing discovered in an abandoned mine in Labrador has led palaeontologists from McGill University and the University of Gdansk to identify a new hairy cicada species that lived around 100 million years ago.
  • WWF recovery plan to save the world's freshwaters from collapse
    [released on: 20/02/2020]
    The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has published an emergency recovery plan to prevent the collapse of biodiversity in the world's freshwater rivers, lakes and wetlands. Freshwater covers approximately 1% of the earth's surface but is home to around 10% of all species and they contain more fish than the world's oceans.
  • Sweden becomes latest nation to join Global Ocean Alliance
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Sweden has become the newest member of the UK's Global Ocean Alliance, which looks to help drive urgent action towards the 30by30 target, which would safeguard 30% of the ocean by 2030 and so helping to protect marine wildlife.
  • 'Astonishing' blue whale numbers at South Georgia
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Scientists say they have seen a remarkable collection of blue whales in the coastal waters around the UK sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia. Their 23-day survey counted 55 animals - a total that is unprecedented in the decades since commercial whaling ended.
  • A plan to save Earth's oceans
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    At least 26 per cent of our oceans need urgent conservation attention to preserve Earth's marine biodiversity, a University of Queensland-led international study has found.
  • Study shows Akumal coral reefs deteriorating rapidly
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Akumal, Q.R. - A new study released by the Centro Ecológico Akumal (CEA) says that approximately half of the coral reef specimens in Akumal are infected with white syndrome disease, which in the past year, has created a mortality rate equivalent to that of the past 10.
  • Great Barrier Reef Shows Early Signs Of Another Major Bleaching Event
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Parts of the Great Barrier Reef are showing signs of heat stress, raising the risk of another major coral bleaching event, scientists from the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority have announced. Eastern Australia has experienced a long period of warmer than usual ocean currents, which has increased water temperatures across two-thirds of the reef 2 to 3 degrees Celsius above average for February, Reuters reported.
  • Trying to bring as many countries to CMS as I can: Executive Secretary
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Amy Fraenkel, Executive Secretary, Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), spoke to Down to Earth on the functioning of the convention at the sidelines of the ongoing 13th Conference of Parties (CoP) in Gandhinagar, Gujarat. Edited excerpts:
  • Delegates adopt Gandhinagar Declaration, tackle global threats to migratory species
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    The Thirteenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS COP13) ended in Gandhinagar, India at the weekend, with the adoption of a number of significant resolutions and decisions to address the conservation needs as well as threats facing migratory species around the globe.
  • Ten new migratory species protected under global wildlife agreement
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Asian elephants, jaguars and great Indian bustards were among 10 new species added to a global wildlife agreement on Saturday.The Thirteenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS COP13) concluded in Gandhinagar, India, with resolutions and decisions adopted to help conserve migratory species globally.
  • Five takeaways from the UN's proposals to protect biodiversity
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Dubbed by some the "other COP", UN negotiations over revised biodiversity targets and a new international framework for nature restoration and conservation (COP15) have not had the same media or political profile as those on climate change
  • New Deal for Nature: Paying the Emperor to Fence the Wind
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    The latest idea to be heavily promoted by big conservation NGOs is doubling the world's so-called "Protected Areas" (PAs) so that they cover thirty percent of the globe's lands and oceans.
  • Tools used to study human disease reveal coral disease risk factors
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    In a study published in Scientific Reports, a team of international researchers led by University of Hawai'i (UH) at Manoa postdoctoral fellow Jamie Caldwell used a statistical technique typically employed in human epidemiology to determine the ecological risk factors affecting the prevalence of two coral diseases-growth anomalies, abnormalities like coral tumors, and white syndromes, infectious diseases similar to flesh eating bacteria.
  • Newly found bacteria fights climate change, soil pollutants
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Cornell researchers have found a new species of soil bacteria-which they named in memory of the Cornell professor who first discovered it-that is particularly adept at breaking down organic matter, including the cancer-causing chemicals that are released when coal, gas, oil and refuse are burned.
  • Forest management that factors in stream distance would help protect arthropods
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    The structure of vegetation and stream distance are important factors to consider in order to protect the biodiversity of forest arthropods, as stated in an article now published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management. The study concludes that farther from a river course, the conditions are better for the communities of arthropods in the forests, since they need a cool and wet microclimate.
  • We must prioritize the protection of ecosystems
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Prioritising and tracking the protection of countries' ecosystems-from wetlands to reefs, forests and more-is critical to protecting Earth's biodiversity.
  • Study reveals hidden risks of estuary development for young salmon
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    A Simon Fraser University-led research team has found significant evidence that human activity in estuaries is impacting juvenile Pacific and Atlantic salmon. The team's review of 167 peer-reviewed studies (from an initial search of 13,000) identified negative impacts from several stressors, including the effects of flood-protecting tidal gates, pollution and habitat modification.
  • Frozen bird turns out to be 46,000-year-old horned lark
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Scientists have recovered DNA from a well-preserved horned lark found in Siberian permafrost. The results can contribute to explaining the evolution of sub species, as well as how the mammoth steppe transformed into tundra, forest and steppe biomes at the end of the last Ice Age.
  • Buzz off, honey industry: National parks shouldn't be milked for money
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Among the vast number of native species damaged by the recent bushfire crisis, we must not forget native pollinators. These animals, mainly insects such as native bees, help sustain ecosystems by pollinating native plants.
  • Québec biodiversity corridor master plan wins urban design award
    [released on: 21/02/2020]
    Civiliti, Land Italia, Table Architecture, and Biodiversité Conseil have won a special jury prize from the National Urban Design Awards in the 'sustainable development' category for the master plan of a biodiversity corridor in Saint-Laurent, Qué.
  • Sisi reviews plans to upgrade natural reserves, preserve biodiversity
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi urged the involvement of the private sector and youth in the projects of the Environment Ministry, including the development of the infrastructure of the natural reserves, while preserving their biological diversity, the Presidency said in a statement on Sunday.
  • Forests that heal: Medicinal plants as an ecosystem service
    [released on: 24/02/2020]
    Five trillion US dollars. That's how much the overall international trade in medicinal plants and their products alone is expected to amount to by the year 2050. Estimates, as far as medicinal plants go, are many.