CBD News Headlines

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  • New publication examines consequences of groundwater depletion to agriculture
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    A new Council of Agricultural Science and Technology, or CAST, paper examines the causes and consequences of groundwater depletion throughout the U.S. with a focus on how this will affect agriculture-the largest sector of groundwater use.
  • How humans derailed the Earth's climate in just 160 years
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Climate change might be the most urgent issue of our day, both politically and in terms of life on Earth. There is mounting awareness that the global climate is a matter for public action.
  • Here's what Warren Buffett thinks about climate change
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Warren Buffett, chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, is for many people the first source to consult when it comes to the development of an investing philosophy. The billionaire investor has has never shied away from sharing his views with the public, either - and not only when it comes to stock market value.
  • 6 Myths About Climate Change Debunked
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Climate change can seem like a far-off distant problem. The reality, though, is that climate change is affecting us today. It's doing this by taking many of the risks we already face naturally-floods and storms, heat and drought-and supersizing or exacerbating them. And the more carbon we produce, the more dangerous the effects will be over the coming decades. Many continue to believe in some misleading myths. Here are the six I hear most frequently.
  • Stronger hurricanes could decimate forests and accelerate climate change, warns study
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico in September 2017, it left devastation in its wake. It took nearly 11 months to restore power across the island and five months to fully restore the island's main water service. Almost 3,000 people were killed, according to official estimates.
  • Report outlines growing climate change-related threats to Great Lakes region
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    A team of Midwestern climate scientists has released a new report with grim predictions about the impact of climate change on the Great Lakes region. The report foresees a growing trend of wetter winters and springs, with increases in heavy rain events leading to flooding, particularly in urban areas with hard surfaces that cannot absorb the excess water. Rural areas will likely see more erosion, and unpredictable cycles of heat and rainfall could undermine agriculture.
  • The human devastation of climate change: Why Cyclone Idai should be a wake-up call for us all
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    While many politicians, world leaders and big corporations speak about the future effects of climate change, poor and impoverished nations are already struggling to battle the consequences of rising global temperatures.
  • Sir David Attenborough vows to convince 'blind' Donald Trump of risk of climate change
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Sir David Attenborough has faced the world's most dangerous predators - but he could be about to take on a much tougher challenge. The veteran naturalist said that he would attempt to convince 'blind' Donald Trump that climate change is a real threat.
  • Chelsea Clinton Shares Her New Picture Book, 'Don't Let Them Disappear' - EXCLUSIVE
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Chelsea Clinton remembers the poaching crisis of the late '80s, back when she was a child. "I remember my mom [Hillary Clinton] and I in Arkansas, trying to learn whatever we could about what was happening and what we could do to try and help elephants," she tells Romper by phone.
  • China plans 'landmark' biodiversity talks
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    A country that now claims it is attempting to chart a development path away from its former "pollute now, clean up later" approach, China will host the most important biodiversity conference in a decade next year.
  • Biodiversity loss in the oceans can be reversed through habitat restoration
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Activities such as laying gas pipelines, trawling for fish, drilling for oil, and even burying internet cables in the deep sea, are destroying marine ecosystems. But studies have shown that reintroducing seaweed and corals to these habitats could ward off the worst effects - and recover marine life.
  • Forest Restoration in Riau Going Strong
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Forests play a bigger part in our lives than we realize. The water we drink, the paper we use, the medicine we take, the houses we build are all derived from a rich ecosystem, along with countless other aspects of our daily lives, and yet we seldom connect all these things with our forests.
  • Hurricane Maria study warns: Future climate-driven storms may raze many tropical forests
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    A new study shows that damage inflicted on trees in Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria was unprecedented in modern times, and suggests that more frequent big storms whipped up by a warming climate could permanently alter forests not only here, but across much of the Atlantic tropics. Biodiversity could suffer as result, and more carbon could be added to the atmosphere, say the authors. The study appears this week in the journal Nature Communications.
  • Forest protection efforts earn Indonesia millions
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    An innovative effort to keep trees in the ground and carbon out of the air is paying dividends in Indonesia - the fifth-highest emitter of carbon dioxide globally.Norway announced on 16 February that it will pay Indonesia for reducing its deforestation by 60 percent in 2017, as compared to 2016. The payment is to be made as part of a REDD+ partnership established in 2010.
  • What we learn from history is that we do not
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    The German philosopher Georg Hegel famously said, "The only thing that we learn from history is that we learn nothing from history." This is a worrying thought because there is so much that went wrong when we look at world history. As we are often told, history repeats itself. Is there a way that we can break that pattern?
  • The European Union and Egypt Celebrate World Water Day
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    On World Water Day, European Union (EU) Ambassador to Egypt Ivan Surkos and Egyptian Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation Dr. Mohamed Abdel-Ati celebrated the occasion on the bank of the Nile River accompanied by a number of European and African Ambassadors, representatives of donor agencies, prominent governmental officials and a selection of media professionals at Afla Garden in El Kanater El Khairia.
  • Huge fossil discovery made in China's Hubei province
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Scientists say they have discovered a "stunning" trove of thousands of fossils on a river bank in China. The fossils are estimated to be about 518 million years old, and are particularly unusual because the soft body tissue of many creatures, including their skin, eyes, and internal organs, have been "exquisitely" well preserved.
  • Call for wetland decade under the U.N. decade on ecosystem restoration (2021-2030)
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    The environmental health of wetlands across the world is deteriorating. The authoritative Global Wetland Outlook released by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands in 2018 highlighted an alarming trend in wetland loss; at least 35 percent of the world's natural wetlands have been lost since 1970.
  • Conserving These Endangered Prawns Is A Tasty Way To Protect Human Health
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Restocking rivers in tropical and subtropical Africa with a large endangered freshwater prawn not only provides locals with a protein-rich food source, but it also breaks the deadly life cycle of schistosomiasis
  • Assam's rhino habitat overtaken by invasives
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    On a gloomy afternoon in May 2018, conservation biologist Bibhab Talukdar was visiting Pobitora National Park in Assam. As he rode an elephant into the grasslands at the core of the park he was met with an alarming sight: a luxuriant growth of a low, bushy herb with small green leaves and creamy white flowers. Locally known as 'congress grass', this plant, Parthenium hysterophorus, is native to the Americas and an alien species in India.
  • Let's build on the plastics revolution - and save our marine habitats
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    If people knew the wonder of the UK's marine habitats they would want to protect them - TV shows like Blue Planet can help. The life of a conservationist often feels like one long struggle, taking little-known challenges and trying to make them mainstream. How do environmental issues move from niche interests to global concerns?
  • Will Large Protected Areas Save the Oceans or Politicize Them?
    [released on: 22/03/2019]
    In the last decade, governments have been pushing to create vast Marine Protected Areas large enough to protect species from overfishing and other threats. But critics are questioning whether the creation of these large protected areas is driven more by geopolitics than conservation.
  • Speaking up for invisible raptors
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Birds of prey such as owls, eagles, falcons and vultures are soaring and elegant predators. But many raptors worldwide have flown under the scientific radar and are all but invisible: Ten species of raptors, out of 557 total, comprise one-third of all raptor research, and one-fifth of all species have never been studied in a scientific publication. That's the conclusion of a recent paper in Diversity and Distributions by University of Utah researchers and their collaborators.
  • Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to Rutgers and other scientists. Their "air bridge" hypothesis could shed light on how harmful bacteria share antibiotic resistance genes.
  • Researchers discover new species of extinct Australian mammal
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    A team of researchers at the Natural History Museum in London and the Western Australian Museum have discovered a new species of very small, incredibly fast, extinct Australian Pigfooted Bandicoot.
  • 3-D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    By generating 3-D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision. The results could contribute to increased knowledge about the pollination process-once researchers are able to determine which flowers different bees see easily, and which ones they find it harder to distinguish.
  • Scientists set sail on expedition to investigate 'Iceberg Alley' off Antarctica
    [released on: 25/03/2019]
    The 5.4 million-square-mile Antarctic Ice Sheet is the greatest mass of fresh water on Earth. If it all were to melt, it would raise global sea levels some 220 feet. Searching for answers to how fast the ice might react to changes in climate, scientists are now studying how that ice reacted to past warm periods similar to today's.